Alexey Navalny is one of Vladimir Putin’s most outspoken critics. After surviving an assassination attempt and recovering in Germany, he returned to Russia in January 2021 to face arrest and imprisonment. Mass protests over his detention and revelations of high-level corruption show that an increasingly repressive Kremlin has not succeeded in crushing opposition to Putin’s rule.

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Navalny vs Kremlin: Latest developments — European Parliamentary Research Service Blog

Putin is not going anywhere — spiked

Navalny supporters protest at Pushkin Square, Moscow, 23 January 2021.

In the last weeks of January it was – almost – possible to believe that Russia was on the brink of a revolution. Now, it is not. The difference, and the reasons for the change, say much – about Russia, about unrealistic perceptions of Russia abroad, and about what could make for political change in Russia in the future.

On 17 January Alexei Navalny – variously described as an anti-corruption campaigner, opposition blogger, or the next president of Russia – took the courageous decision to return to his homeland after spending four months in Germany recuperating from what the German Foreign Ministry said was an assassination attempt. Given the announcement of new criminal charges against him as he was deciding when or whether to return, it is probably fair to say that the Kremlin would have preferred him to remain abroad.

Navalny called on his supporters to meet him at the airport, which they did in such numbers that the authorities diverted his plane to an airport on the other side of Moscow. He was duly arrested. A week later, people turned out on the streets of major Russian cities, from Vladivostok in the east to Kaliningrad in the west, to demand his freedom. They turned out the next weekend, too, though generally in fewer numbers. There was much chatter on social media of Russia having finally awoken from its political slumber, even of the Putin era nearing its end.

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Putin is not about to fall — spiked

Would a “Russian Dissident” Do Better in the “Free World?”, by Gregory Hood — The Unz Review

Most Western media call Russian dissident Alexei Navalny a hero. Mr. Navalny is now in a Russian prison, and our most prestigious newspapers are cheering his anti-Putin crusade. These are official editorial statements from leading publications.

However, what’s most remarkable about the media campaign is its hypocrisy. It’s doubtful Alexei Navalny would be a hero — maybe not even a free man — in the “Free World.”

In 2007 Mr. Navalny made a video that compared people from the Caucasus to insects. To fight “infestation,” Mr. Navalny recommended not a “fly swatter,” but a handgun.

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Would a “Russian Dissident” Do Better in the “Free World?”, by Gregory Hood — The Unz Review