Pierre Dugua de Mons

Henri IV of France

In 1599, Pierre Dugua de Mons, Pierre de Chauvin de Tonnenuit and Samuel de Champlain traveled to North America on behalf of Henri IV, King of France and Navarre, also called le bon roi (the good King). Henri IV wanted France to harvest the rich pelts it could find in Northeastern America. Henri also asked Du Gua de Mons to create a settlement in what are now the Maritime provinces of Canada. Officially, Port-Royal (Annapolis Royal) is the first French settlement in North America.

It was settled in 1604, four years before Champlain settled Quebec City. However, to be precise, Tonnetuit’s trading post was the first French settlement in North America established in 1599, and it was located in the present-day Québec , one of the two provinces of New France. The other was Acadie. Henri IV had been a Protestant, a Huguenot, and so were the above-mentioned explorers.  

Champlain was a secretive Huguenot, but Pierre Dugua de Mon(t)s wasn’t. As for Pierre de Chauvin de Tonnetuit, his occupation, fur trading, was that of a Huguenot. So, if his trading post was the first French settlement in the Americas, the very first French settlement in the Americas was a Huguenot settlement. In fact, although Champlain did not reveal his religious affiliation, he founded Quebec-City in New France’s Huguenot times. But matters changed in 1627. New France was governed by the Company of One Hundred Associates and its first shareholder was Cardinal Richelieu.

More permanent was the fur-trade. The French in Canada tended to their thirty acres, but many had to go to the countries above, les pays d’en haut. They were voyageurs or coureurs des bois. Coureurs des bois did not have a licence, so if caught, the pelts they had harvested were confiscated.

Pierre Chauvin’s trading post. New France would have its legendary voyageurs. They would be Catholics. But Pierre Chauvin’s trading post was a Huguenot settlement.

When Pierre de Chauvin de Tonnentuit returned to France, he left sixteen (16) men at Tadoussac. It was a settlement. Only six (6) survived.

The First French Settlement in the Americas — Micheline’s Blog

Cucked Committee agrees to not only tear down historical mural celebrating the 400th anniversary of explorer Samuel de Champlain’s arrival in Vermont but also agrees Artist Should replace it with a tropical jungle scene — Seven Days — Vermont Folk Troth

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A Burlington City Council subcommittee is working on a proposal to pay a local artist to restore her mural when the controversial “Everyone Loves a Parade!” piece comes down this month. Members of the Parks, Arts and Culture Committee agreed Wednesday that Gina Carrera should fix up her rain forest piece that was covered up by the parade…

Cucked Committee agrees to not only tear down historical mural celebrating the 400th anniversary of explorer Samuel de Champlain’s arrival in Vermont but also agrees Artist Should replace it with a tropical jungle scene — Seven Days — Vermont Folk Troth

Burlington council votes to accelerate removal of mural — VTDigger — Vermont Folk Troth

“This whole issue just proves that all of life quickly devolves into satire when few start to interpret art through a lens of oppression and cultural narcissism and pressure others to act on a manufactured reality.”

“This vote is absolutely disgusting. From the beginning the mural was wrongfully targeted by those seeking a cause. I do not agree with Councilor Pine that the mural is deeply problematic. What I think is deeply problematic is Councilor Dieng calling every councilor racist because they initially voted not to take it down.”

Burlington council votes to accelerate removal of mural — VTDigger — Vermont Folk Troth

Champ: ‘merica’s Loch Ness Monstuh — Hidn Histruh — Vermont Folk Troth

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Lying along thuh borduh betwe’n New ‘ork en Vuhmont (en extendin’ a few miles intuh Canucklund) iz Lake Champlain, one of the largest and deepest freshwater lakes in the northeast. It was the site of several naval and land battles in both the Revolutionary War and the War of 1812, and is celebrated now as […]

Champ: ‘merica’s Loch Ness Monstuh — Hidn Histruh — Vermont Folk Troth

Vermont History — Okemo Lodging

1609 – Samuel de Champlain claimed the Vermont region for France.

1690 – Jacobus de Warm led British soldiers from Albany, New York to a point near the site of present-day Middlebury, Vermont.

1724 – Vermont’s first permanent white settlement was made at Fort Dummer, in what is now Brattleboro.

February 22, 1754 – The Town of Chester was originally chartered by New Hampshire Governor Benning Wentworth under the name of Flamstead. Chester was one of the first towns chartered in Windsor County.

[…]

Vermont History — Okemo Lodging

The College Named After Samuel de Champlain Debates Whether to Keep His Statue — Seven Days

Jayy Covert standing next to the sculpture of Samuel de Champlain at Champlain College - MOLLY WALSH

Samuel de Champlain survived more than 20 voyages on the rough seas between Europe and North America 400 years ago. He canoed to the Vermont lake that now bears his name and helped his Algonquin allies defeat their Iroquois enemies by shooting their stunned chiefs dead with the first gun they had ever seen.

Now the legacy of the celebrated explorer, who once pulled an arrow from his own neck and lived to write the tale, is facing a new threat at one of his many local namesakes: Champlain College.

Some student leaders at the private Burlington school want a larger-than-life bronze sculpture of the Frenchman gazing at Lake Champlain to be removed from a busy campus courtyard. Despite his historical alliance with tribes including the local Abenaki, de Champlain was still one of many colonizers who imposed their own values and suppressed indigenous groups, the critics say.

[…]

The College Named After Samuel de Champlain Debates Whether to Keep His Statue — Seven Days

Local tribal leader weighs in on Plattsburgh statue controversy — MyNBC5

PLATTSBURGH, Adirondacks —

The Samuel de Champlain statue on Cumberland Avenue in the City of Plattsburgh has stood for more than a century.

[…]

Local tribal leader weighs in on Plattsburgh statue controversy — MyNBC5

Québec-Vermont: An Even Better Union, Against State-Sponsored Fear — ZERO ANTHROPOLOGY

…anti-imperialist thinking and practice within Québec, and the fact that Vermont…

…Sinclair Lewis, the state’s Nobel-prize winning author, praised Vermont as a place that escaped “American mania,” a place that resists commercialism and Walmart as much as it resists the skyscraper (same source).

The history of these territories, and the towns, mirror each other: Vermont was once a part of New France (at least until 1763), from which Québec emerged, both territories sharing the names of key French figures in their historical tales, Jacques Cartier and Samuel de Champlain, with the French founding the first European settlement in what is now Vermont. Today, Vermont still has French place names, including the name of the state, and the name of the capital, Montpelier, while some of Québec’s southernmost towns, the so-called “English townships,” bear English names. The northern part of Vermont still has a large number of people of French-Canadian ancestry, and indeed, 23.3% of people in Vermont are of French-Canadian ancestry, with some 2.5% still speaking French at home (source)….

[…]

Québec-Vermont: An Even Better Union, Against State-Sponsored Fear — ZERO ANTHROPOLOGY

What if North America was French? — Phil Ebersole’s Blog

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If the outcome of certain European wars had been different, the dominant culture of North America would be French and not English.

Champlain’s humanistic Catholicism was appealing to the Indians—I think partly because the Christian idea of forgiveness freed them of the duty of carrying on blood feuds without end.

Many Indian nations welcomed European settlers because they saw them as possible allies in their wars with other Indians.  Champlain avoided that trap.  He positioned himself as mediator.

But he did help the Algonquins and Hurons in their wars with the aggressive Iroquois to the South.

The truth is that they are all flawed human beings, trying to protect their interests and get by as best they could.

The main thing Champlain disliked about the Indians he knew was their love of torture.  They delighted in torturing any enemy captive.  In their culture, the ability to stand up to torture was regarded as the supreme test of a warrior’s courage.

However, he did not try to forbid torture.  He would not have succeeded if he had.  His few attempts to intervene ended badly.

…he had no concept of human rights or democracy as these things are understood today. He believed in hierarchy and discipline, not freedom and liberty.

If the American War of Independence had failed, both French and Indian cultures would have a stronger position in North America.

One of the grievances against the British crown was the attempt to prevent the Atlantic colonists from establishing settlements west of the Appalachians.

There was no economic benefit to England in allowing subsistence farmers into what is now Kentucky or Ohio, but there was benefit in promoting the fur trade, which was dominated by French Canadians.

[…]

What if North America was French? — Phil Ebersole’s Blog

French Canadians: The unexplained genetic diversity — Evo and Proud — Vermont Folk Troth

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Interior of a magasin général (source: photographiquement Frank). Wherever there was less competition from British or American merchants, it was easier for French Canadians to go into business. These same regions also have unusually high rates of neurological disorders, including Tay-Sachs. Coincidence? French Canadians have a unique demographic history. From a founding population of some […]

French Canadians: The unexplained genetic diversity — Evo and Proud — Vermont Folk Troth

France to Ban Homeschooling??? — There’s No Place Like Home — Vermont Folk Troth

This year has been one nightmare after another, hasn’t it? The latest episode in the saga of 2020 is the dictatorial decision of the President of France to ban homeschooling. What next? Seriously. I’m done.

France to Ban Homeschooling??? — There’s No Place Like Home — Vermont Folk Troth